Dear Bahati,

I ended up canceling class last night, so I have not debriefed with my students after your presentation; but I wanted to share parts of their journal entries with you.  Students have been making comments like these, and I wanted to let you know how very much we all appreciated your presentation.  You are an amazing advocate, and I'm very glad that my students could benefit from hearing directly from you about your work and about how you were inspired at a difficult and challenging time.  Thank you for all you do.  Diane

 __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

This week we were able to meet with a great advocate for Social Justice. Dr. Bahati Ansari has dedicated her life to ensuring that all students and people are treated equal and have the same rights as everyone else. Social Justice is for everyone, not for some. My group was able to meet and discuss certain topics with her on a one on one meeting because she was assigned to my group when we went over our poems. She really seemed to take an interest in my group and she showed us that she cared for what we were doing and what we were learning in the class. She also took an interest into where we came from and who we were as students, as teachers, and as people. I think that it is truly remarkable how she showed us that we were special even though we were complete strangers. It is very rare for someone to treat you like they have known you forever when they just met you, or even to show a complete stranger that they are special.

    In order to really bring about change, you need to first look in yourself. Change starts with you and then others will come after you. Dr. Bahati works hard to ensure that others are treated equal. She shared with us the stories about her grandchildren and still being active and an advocate for others and promoting social change. As a teacher, I want to be able to do that for my students. I want to promote the advocacy and the voice for my students to know that they can still influence change in others and they should be able to promote the change that they want in the world. I am looking into that safe zone work for my school because I think that my student s would really benefit from knowing that our school is a safe place where you will be safe to be who you are and not to be afraid of being bullied or discriminated against.


Diane Torres-Velásquez, Ph.D.
Associate Professor, Teacher Education

505-277-9098 (office)
505-277-0455 (fax)
505-917-5070 (cell)
 
The University of New Mexico - Hokona Hall-Zuni Rm 113 - MSC 05 3040
 
1 University of New Mexico - Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001
 www.unm.edu

 

Bahatis Portfolio pptfinal.pptx Bahatis Portfolio pptfinal.pptx
Size : 3266.509 Kb
Type : pptx
Marian Malcolm Referense Letter.pdf Marian Malcolm Referense Letter.pdf
Size : 0.005 Kb
Type : pdf
mary meredith references.pdf mary meredith references.pdf
Size : 0.197 Kb
Type : pdf
Louis Durham-Sparks.pdf Louis Durham-Sparks.pdf
Size : 6.111 Kb
Type : pdf
Misa Referense.pdf Misa Referense.pdf
Size : 6.24 Kb
Type : pdf
Felise Dunman Referense.pdf Felise Dunman Referense.pdf
Size : 2.826 Kb
Type : pdf
reference tetter nami.pdf reference tetter nami.pdf
Size : 0.045 Kb
Type : pdf
1565492072_brochure.pdf 1565492072_brochure.pdf
Size : 187.135 Kb
Type : pdf
http://www.humanrights.gov.au/about/media/speeches/race/2012/20120216_Racism_exists.html

“I have spent twenty  years developing this workshop to be a sensitive, healing  and insightful tool for working with people around issues of racism and cultural differences”.

-Bahati Myhelatu Ansari, founder

“Build a broad base of support before attempting to implement the program; start slowly, encourage everyone's efforts. It's a right brain thing--be creative and open to ideas and opportunities from everyplace.  Embed RFZ into the workplace and/or school and community culture and re-evaluate regularly and democratically to make re-dedications meaningful”.

-Crestlane Elementary School, Crestwell, Oregon

"Ms. Ansari has been teaching organizations to be successful in eliminating the attitudes, behaviors, and actions that keep ra­cism alive. She does this by guiding people in establishing Racism Free Zones® to maintain and sustain a safe and healthy environ­ment where racism cannot flourish. The establishment of a Racism Free Zone® affirms the rights of all people to be respected, hon­ored, and celebrated for their diverse backgrounds".


RACISM IN AMERICA'S SCHOOLS. ERIC DIGEST SERIES, NUMBER EA 49.

Author: Beswick, Richard 
-Source: ERIC Clearinghouse on Educational Management Eugene OR. 

HOW EXTENSIVE IS RACISM IN PUBLIC SCHOOLS?

In the progressively liberal, mostly white community of Eugene, Oregon, a study (Savard and Aragon) found that racism exists and may be on the increase. The report stressed the frequency of racial jokes and slurs, derogatory racial stereotyping, and (less often) violent acts left unpunished by school authorities.

Augustine Garcia (1989) notes that our inner cities and areas of high density immigration (California, Florida) are experiencing the intimidation and irrational violence of Neo-Nazi skinheads and racial gangs. Children from dysfunctional families are particularly susceptible to peer pressure to adopt a racist posture.

It is not just the condescension and violence exhibited toward minorities that must be taken into account when looking at incidents of racism. Restrictions on minorities' opportunity to succeed are often racially determined. For example, Asian-Americans incur resentment for academic excellence and "overachieving." If racism is explicit at the street level of society, it is often implicit and equally entrenched at the highest levels.

HOW IS RACIAL PREJUDICE REVERSED?

In addition to deeper curricular remedies, it is important to declare a public repugnance for racism. One such declaration, the "Racism Free Zone (TM)", has been effective in Lane County, Oregon, schools. Created by Bahati Ansari, and modified from the "Nuclear Free Zone" concept, this program begins with a formal day of celebration. A plaque is prominently displayed that reads in part:

"We will not make statements or symbols indicating racial prejudice. Freedom of speech does not extend to hurting others. Racism will not be tolerated and action will be taken to ensure this".

White students acquire a feeling of ownership for this zone of protection, and minority students report a feeling of security and pride.


           "Since 1982, Bahati has gone on to create projects all over the nation and abroad. She recently spoke at the UN Conference Against Racism in Durban and presented the RFZ Model to the world. Next year there will be several projects starting in South Africa.

"In everything, goodness is there. Our goal is to find it. In every person, the best is there, our job is to recognize it. In every situation, the positive is there, our opportunity is to see it. In every problem, the solution is there, our responsibility is trusting in God to resolve it."--Alberta Wooten-Educator

-" I believe there are things you should do to help with this problem.  Even though adults work hard to prevent this sort of thing from happening...couldn't you help to create a climate in your school where everybody is accepted and nobody is picked on because they are not white, poor, or weaker?  I think you could, and I challenge you to do it".--Dr. Margret Nichols, former Superintendent of 4j School District( letter written to the staff after the incident with Ms. Ansari's son at Jefferson Middle School in 1980

" I am very proud of the Cal Young students who initiated the move to make Cal Young Middle School a Racism Free Zone (TM) and of all those people in our school who chose to sign the Racism Free Zone statement".  --Evie Matthews, Principal of Cal young Middle School

"The two schools, public and parochial receptively are to become "Racism Free Zone"  as a part o fa project sponsored by the Greater Dayton Christian Council.  The new project is based on a program pioneered in Eugene, Ore, By Bahati Ansari, national director of the Racism Free Zone Project (tm), said the Rev. Dick Duncan, the GD-CC chief."-Dayton News, 8,18,1990

                                                                        

"Has the school changed much since the declaration was adopted?  Student Beth Schultz says it has.  "People are more cautious.  Attitudes have changed,"she said.  She advises others who might want to establish a zone in their school to take the project seriously.  "Don't joke about it," She said.

                                                   --Beth Schultz, former student, Spenser Butte Middle School,  June 13, 1988 news article.

Proudfoot Letter.pdf Proudfoot Letter.pdf
Size : 2.949 Kb
Type : pdf
Cornell University Keynote.pdf Cornell University Keynote.pdf
Size : 2.057 Kb
Type : pdf
Louis Durham-Sparks.pdf Louis Durham-Sparks.pdf
Size : 6.111 Kb
Type : pdf
Felise Dunman Referense.pdf Felise Dunman Referense.pdf
Size : 2.826 Kb
Type : pdf
Chinosole Reference.pdf Chinosole Reference.pdf
Size : 1.504 Kb
Type : pdf
Nichols letter.pdf Nichols letter.pdf
Size : 1164.645 Kb
Type : pdf
1565492072_brochure.pdf 1565492072_brochure.pdf
Size : 187.135 Kb
Type : pdf